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    With Thanksgiving approaching, it's a good idea to refresh our memory on the "Don’t Feed” list for our furry little friends. Okay, I think everyone knows to keep the chocolate away from our furry friends, but I’m going to say it one more time just in case.

    Here are a few dangerous items for you to remember during the holiday season.

    chocolateSweet Treats: Chocolate is toxic to dogs. But not everyone knows about the dangers of xylitol, a sweetener and baking ingredient found in many types of gum, mints, candy and pastries. Consuming a little bit of xylitol can give a dog seizures, low blood sugar and liver failure and can be fatal.

     

    Our furry friends fur serves as great protection during the winter. However dog parents may not be aware that their dog’s fur can be fatal in the heat of spring and summer. As the temperature rises, we must be aware of the potential of a dog heat stroke or heat stress.

    It is important to understand that dogs become hot as well and aren’t the same as us. We can take a coat off if we get too hot, but they can’t. They may shed but they will still have a coat.

    By panting, dogs are able to cool down by circulating air through their bodies. They also can cool down by drinking or swimming in water. Dogs will show signs when becoming to hot such as panting, which can be mistaken for excitement during a game of catch or the joy of seeing you.

     

    The 5 most common and visible signs of heat stress in our pets include:

    heavy panting

    glazed eyes

    a rapid pulse, unsteadines

    staggering gait

    vomiting or a deep red or purple tongue

     

    Your furry friend is at higher risk for heatstroke if she is older, overweight, short nosed, thick-coated, low-energy, out of shape, doesn’t drink enough water, and/or has underlying diseases like heart, respiratory, endocrine disorders, or arthritis.

     Cowboy wide receiver Lucky Whitehead took to his instagram account to report that his dog, Blitz was stolen from his house a week ago.  Lucky Whitehead has been receiving calls demanding ransom in exchange for his puppy. 

    Lucky Whitehead

     Whitehead posted a picture of Blitz on Instagram on Sunday night, alleging that someone broke in and stole his dog.

    Whitehead also said that he had gotten numerous messages to his phone "demanding ransom money."  Whitehead then asked for any information regarding who may have taken the dog.

     

    Lucky Whitehead with Blitz

    You have to be a special kind of person to brake in and steal a dog, and then demand ransom.  

    We hope Blitz is returned to his forever home real soon and unharmed.

     

    UPDATE:  "Look who made it home safely!!!" Whitehead posted with a short video of his dog. 

    For more information or to follow this story click here

    See that lonely tennis ball, Do NOT pick it up and keep your Furry friend AWAY.

    According to CBS News, police are issuing warnings about homemade fireworks planted inside tennis balls called "tennis ball bombs".
    "Some of them are very effective and dangerous, and some of them don't work, but you don't know," Jarod Kasner, public information officer for the Kent Police Department in Washington state, told CBS News. "People light them, leave them thinking it's a dud, but who knows what's happening on the inside. Then a dog comes and picks it up..."

    In 2000, a Portland man was reportedly on a walk with his dog when he spotted a tennis ball in the grass. Without giving it a second thought, the man picked up the ball and tossed it to the pup.

    When the dog bit down, the ball exploded, CBS Sacramento reports; the pet had to be euthanized immediately.
    "If it doesn't go 'boom' some people just walk away from it," Kasner said. "Unfortunately, dogs pick up everything up in their mouth and bring it to you."

    There's a serious hazard for people, too, Kasner explained, because there's a chance the explosive ball could go off in your hand.
    "It could be smoldering on the inside and when you move it around that's when it goes off," Kasner said.

    A tennis ball bomb is very easy to identify. It is a real tennis ball that has some sort of fuse sticking out of it. Here is a picture of one.

    kent police department tennis ball
    The tennis ball could also be completely wrapped in duct tape with a fuse sticking out. If you come across a tennis ball that looks suspicious, it's best to call 911 or your local police.

    This may not be in your home town, but be on the look out for copycats.

    You can read more at:

    https://sacramento.cbslocal.com/2016/06/28/homemade-tennis-ball-firecrackers-especially-dangerous-for-dogs/

    https://insider.foxnews.com/2016/06/29/police-warn-dog-owners-about-homemade-tennis-ball-bombs

     

    Trivia Tuesday Dog Fact

    Dogs have disconnected shoulder bones (lacking the collar bone of the human skeleton) that allow a greater stride length for running and leaping. They walk on four toes, front and back, and have vestigial dewclaws on their front legs and on their rear legs.

     

    MONTCLAIR, New Jersey A dog was thrown from a car during an apparent road rage incident in New Jersey, and the incident was recorded by witnesses and posted on social media.

    The video, taken by two people in a car behind the two vehicles involved, shows two men fighting in the street. After an older man punches and shoves a younger one while shouting profanity, the younger man pulls the dog from the older man's passenger seat and throws it on the sidewalk.

     

     

    for more on this story click here.

     

     

     

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